Posts in Comedy

Standup Showdown Comedy Competition

Awesome Okanagan Presents:
Standup Showdown Comedy Competition Hosted by Kyle Patan

Brought back by popular demand Awesome Okanagan presents its second Standup Showdown Comedy show at The Habitat, hosted by our 1st competition winner Kyle Patan. This comedy show has no boundaries, pushes the comics to the limit and brings to the table the unique blend of local comedic talent at its finest. Awesome Okanagan is making the comics turn up the heat for the second comedy competition by putting $400 in cash prizes on the table to be won.

The comedians will have to compete against one another and joke their way through three stages. The audience will decide who moves on to the next round and which of the top three will take home the cash prizes.

1st place will win $200

2nd place $125

3rd place $75

Come to Habitat on Saturday March 28th and see who wins the Standup Showdown.

Doors 8pm
Advance Tickets $10
Available at Mosaic Books, Leo’s Videos & Ticketfly
Door Tickets $10
19+ (no minors)

If Only Comedians Could Play The Hits

comedy

Photo by Joe Moroney

Article Submitted by David Kopp

Stand up comedians have it rough now. In the 80’s and 90’s, they could travel the country with a solid hour of material they honed over the years. Everywhere they went it was new and fresh. At least to the audience.

Musicians can play their one hit song and everybody loves it, but no one wants to hear a comedian’s jokes from last week. YouTube has made this even tougher on the pro comics. With audience members posting clips of unfinished jokes online, it is becoming even harder to keep audiences in suspense.

The silver lining is that this forces comedians to write more material than ever before and, as a result, everyone is getting better. Today could be seen as the new golden age of comedy. Comedy really is everywhere. Every full time comedian has a podcast and a special and most touring comics have at least a one DVD of amazing material for sale and a few great clips online.

The other effect of there being so much comedy available is that the bar has also been raised. Almost everyone in the audience watches the newest comedy specials. This is obviously great for comedy, but it also means a new comedian is performing to a pretty savvy crowd. New comics are forced to learn the trade quite quickly or deal with perhaps the worst feeling imaginable… bombing. A crowd who talks through a set is annoying, but when they sit silently through it, there is really no one else to blame. No artist ever bombs as hard as a comedian and even if a comedian does find that special line that works every time, eventually everyone’s heard it and its no longer special. No comedian can tour like the Rolling Stones, getting by on forty year old material when the new stuff sucks.

Comedians really are in a unique position. Just imagine if at your job you were constantly compared to the best performers of all time’s very best performances. No one ever says to the best architects in town, “Yeah, that is pretty nice, but have you seen the Taj Mahal? You should make buildings like that.” However, it is common, after a set, to hear “You should do jokes like Seinfield. I saw him. All he really does is talk, but its so funny.”

Why You May Not Survive the Mystic Trail at Mabel Lake

If you ever find your way up to Mabel Lake (via Lumby or Enderby) you’ll drive off paved roads into the forest and are likely to find a quiet, out-of-the-way lake with no cell reception. If this sounds like the beginning of every horror movie you’ve ever seen, congratulations you’ve seen through our preamble.

In classic horror cliché, we arrived Saturday with fresh food and cold beer to an already in-progress birthday party. Adventures kept pretty close to the campsite that initial day due to the fact that we were a big crowd and it’s fundamentally impossible to motivate our group to much more than a 1km ‘hike.’ The sun was hot and the sand was hotter, it was about all you could do to stay conscious all day. Exploring required more effort than we would muster smoldering under a scorching summer sun. Temperatures in the shade were reaching 32º+ and borderline uncomfortably frosty dips were important to help revitalize at much needed intervals throughout the day.

Pictured Here

Pictured here: comfortable shade and not-at-all the gateway to someone’s harrowing descent into madness.

Come Sunday, most members of our group made their way back to civilization and only the 3 of us remained; myself, Mitch & Katy. I had mentioned trails or waterfalls I thought I recalled from my youth that were nearby. Back in the day, my parents and I would go camping often. Of the many destinations we visited, Sugar and Mabel Lake were pretty regular. I guess the proximity to our house in Lavington made them pretty ideal for a quick trip away from home and, perhaps more importantly, an equally quick trip back at the end of a sun-baked weekend. We were already on the hunt for firewood that day so we thought we’d kill two birds with one stone, find the campsite host, and ask about any notable landmarks. After all, there is no way this could end with us being chased through the woods by the Blair Witch.

Maybe using the word "kill" was just asking for trouble.

Maybe using the word “kill” was just asking for trouble.

Upon meeting our host, she directed us a short trip up the road. She mentioned Cascade Falls (a place we couldn’t find to save our lives) and, at 15 1/2 forestry kilometer, The Mystic Trail. A ‘magical’ little path whose name is missing about two adjectives and three exclamation points. The campsite host’s description of “a cute little area where someone carved some neat things into the hill” really undersold the horror of what we were about to encounter.

"Oh good. This isn't foreboding."

“Oh good. This isn’t foreboding.”

The trail is adjacent to a haunted bridge and marked by a staggeringly-large amount of shoes nailed to a tree that locals have taken to calling the shoe tree. We won’t speculate why and assume any reason for this name is surely lost to time. Looking back, I suppose it’s my own fault that “neat things” didn’t immediately infer that they would be unspeakably nightmarish things. Maybe I was expecting stick-man drawings on rocks, or GRAD2013, or even Robbie + Julie 4Ever in a heart. Definitely something over-emphasizing the permanence of youth.

Hindsight

Here “someone carved some neat things” like this spinal column, unpleasantly twisted into the guise of the Ogopogo’s evil twin.

Naturally hindsight is 20/20, or it would have been if our eyes weren’t plucked straight from their sockets while tempting the curse of the Mystic Trail that we absolutely didn’t just make up.

I want to believe this place is only unintentionally terrifying and probably meant to evoke feelings of whimsy in adults and children alike. Makes sense. Everyone knows little boys and girls enjoy mutilated skulls and trash dolls displayed in gruesome manners meant to mock death in many creative ways.

I See You

Even with warm, summery Instagram filters, this is only barely passable as the least paralyzing piece of art present.

Now, there’s nothing saying any of these bones or parts are from humans. For example, we escaped alive and slept through the night with only a few mosquito bites to show for it. Had this mockery of the human death experience been made of actual persons we’re pretty sure only one of us would have escaped alive. I’m half-Mexican and Mitch is the big, white guy, sooo clearly the survivor would have been Katy.

"Hey. Haunt here often?"

Especially after I literally taunted the “artwork.”

Jokes aside, it was a pretty sweet little tour and quick way to beat the heat. Just don’t spend the night inside the tiny, abandoned cabin or pee on any of the dolls and you’ll probably make it out unscathed.

That or you'll find yourself buried in this patch of Skull Daisies. Which were exactly as petrifying as you'd expect.

That or you’ll find yourself in this patch of Skull Daisies, which are exactly what you’d think they were if you were expecting them to be lots of tiny bird skulls.

Thanks to Katy (@ktken on Instagram) for snapping pictures while my iPhone cowered in the vehicle.

Ecotone – The Experience

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There was no shortage of things to see and do at this year’s Ecotone, held in the Rotary Center for the Arts, and while I can’t dream of having been able to cover it all I can give you a taste of my experience in the hopes of getting you out to the next one. This year’s Ecotone was the “6th Annual Local, Organic, and Zero-Waste, Okanagan underground creative gathering known as Conduit”. It featured a massive line-up with events happening simultaneously all throughout the centre.  General Admission was $15 at the door, which opened at 4pm. The event ran until 2am.

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The atrium was the center of the festivities and hosted several drum circles, poets, and musicians. There was everything from hip hop and beat boxing to folk and rock bands. Some performances were accompanied by artists from other disciplines, including a poet who had a melody support their words and a musician who had a visual canvas express their music. It was a great mix of mediums and skills that really displayed the bonds between the people involved in the art community.

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The Arcade room, a pitch dark room lit up by a cool projection in the center, hosted other assorted performances and provided yet another space to dance in; the Alternator Center showed a few shorts created with stop motion film techniques and clay figurines; and the main theater hosted a one-time comedy performance titled “This is Cancer” by Bruce Horak, who lost most of his vision to cancer.

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In the Exhibit Hall and upstairs you could find visual art by dozens of artists displayed on the walls. There was everything from photography to collages to paintings and more. There were also a few interactive installations. One of my favorite was the “stream of consciousness” typewriter that’s fed with a roll of paper towel. Anyone could sit down and contribute anything to the narrative that they felt like sharing.

Continue Reading…

Ogopogo vs. Darrin Rose

“Human. It is on.” –The Ogopogo

On March 31 Comedian Darrin Rose wrote an article in the National Post Travel section about his favourite things in Kelowna, BC. He will be performing in Kelowna at the Mary Irwin Theatre on Saturday, April 21 as part of his Chasing Manhood Tour. In this article Darrin stated:

“The best Kelowna landmark is the Ogopogo statue, a tribute to the legendary sea monster that haunts Okanagan Lake. I respect the aplomb of a people who created a legend out of what was, in all likelihood, a floating log.”
http://www.nationalpost.com/Darrin+rose+legend+floating+ogopogo+that/6390440/story.html

The Ogopogo did not take kindly to Darrin’s remark. The Ogopogo took to twitter to air his grievance:


http://twitter.com/TheOgopogo/status/186569935760269312

Two-time Canadian Comedy Award nominee Darrin Rose does not take threats from lake monsters lightly so he has decided to take this twitter beef to YouTube

Who will be victorious? Who will win #MeatCountdown2012? The infamous dweller of Okanagan Lake, The Ogopogo? Or star of CBC’s Mr D, Darrin Rose?

Where: The Mary Irwin Theatre (421 Cawston Avenue)
When: Saturday, April 21, 2012 — 8:00PM
How Much: $29
For: Everyone

Get Oig’d

We’re not quite sure what’s going on here with Dan Oig‘s first Episode of Oig’d. What we do know is we probably a) wouldn’t let him make us dinner based on the vegetation we see him eat here, and b) maybe wouldn’t let him teach us yoga either. Other then that, we’d be eager to go on a day-date with him, because he seems to know how to spend an afternoon.

FOG/VLOG

I’m at RockRidge Canyon Resort in Princeton, BC right now with 20 of the best musicians in British Columbia including Kelowna’s own Fields of Green for the PEAK Performance Project. We’ve been making the bands blog each day and lucky for you, FOG have been vlogging for the last three days. Catch their first three vlogs and if you want to see more, visit peakperformanceproject.com.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Turn of the century hideaway turns murderous


Salmon Arm’s R.J. Haney Heritage Village and Museum always offers visitors a throwback to the turn of the century.  On a 40 acre chunk of property on the outskirts of Salmon Arm, located at 751 Hwy 97B, a street has been re-created lined with many of the heritage buildings from Salmon Arm’s past, with from blacksmith shops to the original radio station, an old gas station and a firehouse. This by donation destination (with the exception of special events) is ran by a society of volunteers eager to keep these pieces of  history alive.

One of the popular events that the village holds every summer is a series of dinner theatre  on an open air stage amongst the trees, just across from a hundred year old church. This years Villains and Vittles Dinner Theatre production has been written and directed by Salmon Arm Resident Peter Blacklock, the play being set in  1885, at a time when the railroad was still being pushed through our province.  The city had not yet been established, and few buildings made up what is now Salmon Arm including Dutch Charlie’s Gambling House and Brewery it is here that the story takes place with a unique flair of music and drama, that is sure to entertain the entire family as they watch the events of the story “The Mystery of Dutch Charlie” unfold.

Admission to the Theatre includes home cooked dinner true to the pioneer era including all the fixings. With showings Wednesday, Friday and Sunday evenings until August 26th.

Reservations are a MUST and tickets are on sale for; Adults $24 Seniors $21 and Children under 13 are $14. You can make reservations by calling the museum at 25-832-5243 or visiting the website here .

Keep up to date with other events at the museum on their facebook page, whether its the upcoming Music in the Village (July 23), or antique car show (August 14) or anything in between, the village offers something for everyone.